What is Wearable Technology?


Wearable technology refers to devices that can be worn by users, taking the form of an accessory such as jewelry, sunglasses, a backpack, or even actual items of clothing such as shoes or a jacket. The benefit of wearable technology is that it can conveniently integrate tools, devices, power needs, and connectivity within a user’s everyday life and movements. Google's “Project Glass” is one of the most talked about current examples — the device resembles a pair of glasses, but with a single lens. A user can see information about their surroundings displayed in front of them, such as the names of friends who are in close proximity, or nearby places to access data that would be relevant to a research project. Wearable technology is still very new, but one can easily imagine accessories such as gloves that enhance the user’s ability to feel or control something they are not directly touching. Wearable technology already in the market includes clothing that charges batteries via decorative solar cells, that allows interactions with a user’s devices via sewn-in controls or touch pads, or that collects data on a person's exercise regimen from sensors embedded in the heels of their shoes.

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(1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?


(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?

  • It's more than just wearable.National Taiwan University have developed a sensor that indicates activity inside your mouth, which includes eating, drinking, talking, smoking, breathing, coughing and more.
    http://www.trendhunter.com/trends/smart-tooth-sensors
  • add your response here

(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on STEM+ education?

  • add your response here
  • add your response here

(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?


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